Brian Klopf, \'17 food science, will begin coursework this fall in Europe to pursue a master\'s degree. He was one of 20 students selected for the competitive European Masters in Food Studies program.
Brian Klopf, \'17 food science, will begin coursework this fall in Europe to pursue a master\'s degree. He was one of 20 students selected for the competitive European Masters in Food Studies program.

Food science graduate to pursue master’s degree in Europe

A 2017 Iowa State University graduate is among 20 students selected to a competitive master’s program in Europe.

Brian Klopf, ’17 food science, was selected to participate in the European Masters in Food Studies program.

The two-year program has students travel to and study at four different universities throughout Europe during their first year – AgroParisTech in France, Lunds University in Sweden, University College Cork in Ireland and Wageningen University in the Netherlands. The second year is spent working on their thesis project, which is conducted over the course of nine months in an industrial research laboratory. In addition, throughout the course of the two-year program, the students are working on team projects.

Klopf said he decided to apply to the program as a way to work toward his goal of obtaining an international career. The German classes he took during high school and his undergraduate college career “opened his eyes” to the opportunities made available by knowing a second language.

“Working on global teams at internships has also pushed me to pursue working with people all around the world, and I felt that this program would be a great stepping stone,” Klopf said.

He also received encouragement from professors within Iowa State’s Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition (FSHN).

Mickie Deaton, academic adviser for the FSHN department, said Klopf tried to be as academically diverse as possible. When his professors and the professionals at his internships encouraged him to “learn as much as possible about as much as possible,” he listened.

“He took classes outside of the degree requirement because he knew that the knowledge he would gain from them would give him an edge over those who didn’t,” Deaton said. “When he was encouraged to spend a summer working with pet food, and not in the human food sector, he did. That diversity of experience has really paid off.”

Klopf also strove to diversify his experiences within the FSHN department. Deaton said Klopf quickly became involved in the FSHN First-Year Learning Community during his freshman year, attending nearly all of the events. He also served as a Peer Mentor and student speaker at FSHN Day and held various leadership positions within the Culinary Science Club and Zeitgeist (German Association) on campus.

“Brian was always willing to share his experiences with other students,” Deaton said. “He put a lot of effort into helping new students feel welcome.”

Deaton said, based on Klopf’s hard work and the connections he made while at Iowa State, the news that he had been accepted into the European Masters in Food Studies program was not a surprise to her.

Even though the program doesn’t start until September, Klopf already is looking forward to traveling to the four different universities.

“I am extremely excited to meet people from all over the world that I will be taking classes with,” Klopf said. “With the program, I am most excited to study food physics, food business management, food processing and process design, and the product innovation course.”

Following graduation from the program, Klopf plans to find a job where he can apply his international insight of the food industry to a company.

CONTACTS

Brian Klopf, ’17 food science graduate, klopf@iastate.edu

Mickie Deaton, FSHN academic adviser, 515-294-4465, mjdeaton@iastate.edu

Whitney Sager, communications coordinator, 515-294-9166, wjsager@iastate.edu

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